050 | Spiritual Disciplines: Flexing For God

Welcome to episode 50 of The UnSunday Show. Let’s talk about spiritual disciplines. Spiritual disciplines are a group of activities that vary from group to group or church to church, that we’re told we need to be doing to ensure spiritual maturity. It’s an activity list of things like reading your Bible, prayer, giving, sharing your faith, etc. that institutional environments use as a vehicle for tracking accountability and compliance to preset standards of behavior.

In this episode I interact a little with this article:

Let’s talk…

049 | Whose Faith Is It?

Welcome to episode 49 of The UnSunday Show. Let’s talk about faith. In the letter to the Hebrews we’re told that without faith it’s impossible to please [God]. That sounds a little daunting. Does that mean I’m responsible to fabricate a certain amount of faith every day to make sure God is happy with me? What if I fail in my attempts at faith? Is God displeased with me? How do I know when I’ve succeeded? How much faith is enough faith? How do I know when I’ve done enough? In the letter to the Ephesians we read that faith is a gift. But how can it be both a requirement and a gift? That seems like a contradiction.

This episode centers around Galatians 2:20 where Paul said:

“I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.”

Let’s talk…

048 | Institutional Religion’s Shady Past

Welcome to episode 48 of the UnSunday Show. Let’s take a few minutes to talk about institutional religion’s shady past. This is in response to a comment someone left back in episode 46 (Who Has Bewitched You?) that deserves some attention. The comment was actually in two parts. The first part was more of an observation when this person said, “Communities used to be built around the church, literally.” I agree with that. Entire communities existed around the centrality of the institutional church, but not always by choice.

This individual went to to ask, “Wasn’t that a good thing that bonded communities?” I think this is a really good question that can’t be answered with a simple yes or no. So let’s take a closer look at it in light of a couple of snippets in church history and let’s see if the way institutional Christianity bonded communities was a good thing that created genuine community.